What Saturday Night Live can teach you about managing a PR crisis

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A Forbes contributor recently published a list of the biggest PR crises of 2017. Among the no-brainer inclusions was the Pepsi ad, which is interesting, because there’s a video out there that should be mandatory viewing for every PR professional.

That would be the SNL parody of that same Pepsi ad.

It’s a must-see not just because it’s hilarious, but because, like all good comedy, it hides important truths within the laughs.

Quick synopsis: The skit imagines the ad’s director about to start shooting on what, in his mind, is the biggest and best day of his career. Excited, he hops on a call with his sister and shares the details of the commercial. We can’t hear her response, but his face says it all. She’s reacting the way most of us would  - and ultimately did. He goes into a panic as he looks around and suddenly sees what’s really happening: imminent disaster.

Simply put, she burst his bubble.

You’re in a bubble, like it or not

Most corporate or “in-house” PR professionals work in a bubble. It’s almost unavoidable. They spend every day inside a rah-rah culture (that they often help create). Their organizations are full of people with competing roles, priorities, agendas, viewpoints and personalities. What binds them together is a shared desire for the organization to do well, but also to keep their jobs secure and career plans on track.

It’s not a bad thing. It’s just life. But once inside a bubble, it’s hard to be objective about things. It’s also harder to speak up in a way that could single you out.

Then along comes a troublesome issue, and it passes through the bubble with grave consequences. Or a full-blown crisis hits, demanding a speedy response, firm and bold decisions, and very often a need to speak uncomfortable truths or admit wrongs. But the problem with being in a bubble limits your ability to think objectively and can lead you to overlook the obvious.

As SNL notes, bubble thinking played a role in the Pepsi ad. But have a look at the other PR blunders on the Forbes list. From the outside looking in, their solutions seem too obvious – just apologize, fix, delete, admit. These are sophisticated organizations, home to endless pools of talent, but I’m convinced they were too deep in the bubble to do what needed to be done.

What you need to do

The lesson is clear. You need to inoculate yourself against bubble thinking so that when issues or crises hit, they can be addressed properly, objectively and with speed. Here’s how:

  • Forget the words “it’s just…”. I can’t tell you how many times in my career someone called me to flag a potential issue, but worked extra hard to downplay it. “It’s just someone venting on Facebook” or “It’s just an isolated incident” or some such thing. One sure sign of bubble thinking: overestimating anything good, downplaying anything bad. Give every issue close attention, no matter how small it may seem.
  • Go outside. Talk to your agency, if you have one. Or contact one if you don’t. If an agency is not a viable option, call a friend or colleague you trust. No matter how you do it, get an independent temperature check. People with nothing at stake will give you the real goods.

 

  • Trust your gut. You have your job for reason – you know this stuff. Listen to what your inner voice is telling you, even when everyone else feels otherwise, and speak up! It could make you a hero.

Do you have a bubble story to share? Or your own tips for dealing with bubble thinking? Share them below!